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Post Closing

The Closing is Over but What About the Post Closing

Click Here to Enroll

This course is approved for 1 credit.
The following is an outline of what will be covered in the course:

Eye on the Prize/ Get it Closed

  1. Fiduciary Responsibility / Commitments
  2. Disbursements
  3. Risk Factors

What Is Post-Closing? 

  1. Recordings
  2. Money
  3. Lien Release and Trustee Services
  4. Original Documents
  5. Culture – the details

Recording – Priority  

  1. Importance of Immediate Recordation
    1. Compliance
    2. Policy Liability / Gap
    3. Customer Satisfaction
    4. Underwriter Relationship
    5. Minimize Title Liability
    6. Supports prompt funding
    7. What is E-Recording? How does it help?

Follow the Money

  1. Payoffs
  2. Insurance, Taxes, High Risk Items
  3. Good Funds vs. Collected Funds

Reconciliation

  1. 3 way reconciliation
  2. Consumer funds
  3. Balance in Files
  4. Fraud
  5. Security
  6. Escheat
  7. Protecting consumer funds

Lien Release Tracking

  1. Have a process
  2. Follow through
  3. What to do when you can’t wrap it up

Outsourcing

  1. How does it all work?
  2. Curative
  3. Settlement

The Challenge of Change

  1. Getting Staff buy in
  2. Creating a culture that supports thorough post-closing processes

Presenting this course are:

Vicki DiPasquale
National Sales Manager
Simplifile
Liz Tanner
Tanner Law, Ltd.
Final Trac
16B Gooding Ave,
Bristol RI 02809
(401) 253-7854

Click Here to Enroll

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Integrated Mortgage Disclosure course by Anne Anastasi approved in New Jersey

New Integrated Mortgage Disclosure with Anne Anastasi

2 credits

Click Here to Enroll

Former ALTA Presidient Anne Anastasi discusses the New Integrated Mortgage disclosure in this course published by Learntitle.com. The course covers:

  • New terminology
  • New definitions
  • Aspects of inclusion on the “Provider List”
  • Tolerances
  • Preparation and Delivery
  • The new form

Anne AnastasiAnne Anastasi if a former president of the American Land Title Association. She has been instrumental in speaking for the Land Title Industry as the the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau redesigns how real estate transactions will be done.

How to create a strong password

ALTA Best practices encourages the use of strong passwords for your computer systems. Passwords provide the first line of defense against unauthorized access to your computer. The stronger your password, the more protected your computer will be from hackers and malicious software. You should make sure you have strong passwords for all accounts on your computer. If you’re using a corporate network, your network administrator might require you to use a strong password.

Check the strength of your password here

What makes a password strong (or weak)?

A strong password:

  • Is at least eight characters long.

  • Does not contain your user name, real name, or company name.

  • Does not contain a complete word.

  • Is significantly different from previous passwords.

  • Contains Uppercase letters, Lowercase letters, numbers and symbols

A password might meet all the criteria above and still be a weak password. For example, No1password! meets all the criteria for a strong password listed above, but is still weak because it contains a complete word. N01 p@ssw0rd! is a stronger alternative because it replaces some of the letters in the complete word with numbers and also includes spaces.

Help yourself remember your strong password by following these tips:

  • Create an acronym from an easy-to-remember piece of information. For example, pick a phrase that is meaningful to you, such as My daughter’s birthday is 28 October, 1974. Using that phrase as your guide, you might use Mdbi28/Oct,74 for your password.

  • Substitute numbers, symbols, and misspellings for letters or words in an easy-to-remember phrase. For example, My daughter’s birthday is 28 October, 1974 could become MiDauBrthd8iz 281074 (it’s OK to use spaces in your password).

  • Relate your password to a favorite hobby or sport. For example, I love to play basketball could become ILuv2PlayB@sk3tb@ll.

If you feel you must write down your password in order to remember it, make sure you don’t label it as your password, and keep it in a safe place.

Check the strength of your password here